Annotated bibliography Court Bailiff

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Annotated Bibliography

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Cole, G., Smith, C., & DeJong, C. (2015). Criminal justice in America. Boston: Cengage

Learning.

In this book “CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN AMERICA”, the authors George Cole, Christina DeJong, and Christopher Smith have managed to accomplish much within quite a brief format. This is a concise introduction to criminal justice which introduces its readers to Criminal Justice’s foundations and components, as well as the many professional opportunities that are available therein, all within an interdisciplinary framework that is unique and emphasizes on the impacts of public policy on criminal justice, as practiced today. While this resource is Created as an alternative to the more cumbersome and encyclopedic introductory texts, it is reader-friendly and incorporates themes, ideas, and theories from law, criminology, psychology, sociology, history, and political science.

This resource is very important in the project not only because of the fact that it points out the careers and professions in the criminal justice system, but also because of the fact that it has a strong interdisciplinary emphasis that teaches us to become better citizens of our country by taking us through the critical thought of what justice in our society means, as well as what roles individuals can play in defining that meaning.

Gaines, L., & Miller, R. (2015). Criminal justice in action: The core (Eighth ed.). Boston:

Cengage Learning.

This is a career focused, concise, and an up to date resource that delivers an applied and accessible introduction to the field of criminal justice. It presents topics and cases that are extracted from today’s headlines, and putting students at the center of all the action with vivid examples that are relatable and demonstrate the principles that are core in the American justice system.

This resource is very relevant in my final project, mainly because it combines the right coverage depths with a wealth of tools of learning that appeals to a variety of learning styles. This will help in understanding the roles played by various professions in the Criminal justice system.

Law, J. (2015). A dictionary of law (Eighth ed.). Oxford: Oxford University press.

This resource is a comprehensive and an authoritative source of free legal information. It contains more than 4,700 entries that define clearly the major terms, processes, concepts, and the general organization of the legal system. Entries are fully updated in this book to incorporate the latest changes in legislation, including those entries on Police and Crime Commissioners and foreign national offenders, and there is a Citation and Writing Guide that is very useful and it specifically addresses the problems and the conventions for writing legal reports and essays.
This resource is so important in the final project because it is an invaluable source of reference for students, professionals and anyone else who is in need of clarification of legal terms.

McDermott, S. (2012). The jury in Lincoln’s America. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press.

McDermott in this book focuses on the jury’s status as a democratic institution and the status of the people who served as jurors. Based on the history of law in America, the author draws from a collection of legal records, county histories, docket books, and surviving newspapers, to reveal the enormous power that the jurors exhibited over the character of their communities and the litigants.

Studying the history of the interaction between the court professionals and other people is very important in the final project, mainly because of the scope of the project and the issues it looks forward to raising.

Rubenser, L., & Priddy, G. (2011). Constables, marshals, and more forgotten offices in Texas

law enforcement. Denton: University of North Texas Press.

Gloria Priddy and Lorie Rubenser lay the groundwork on how to become a professional in the criminal justice system, such as a peace officer and a court bailiff. They again examine the oft-overlooked offices criminal justice offices such as the constable, bailiff, railroad police, and attorney investigators, among others. This book is useful for any policing courses at whatever levels, and it is very instrumental in the understanding of the requirements in each of these positions.

It is important as a reference material because it provides a more in-depth analysis of the lesser known order enforcement positions in and out of court. This book explains the historical and legal aspects of these positions, as well as the roles and duties of those officers in the Texas criminal justice system.

Shelden, R., Brown, W., Miller, K., & Fritzler, R. (2015). Crime and Criminal Justice in

American Society (Second ed.). Illinois: Waveland press.

While Crime and Criminal Justice in American Society includes the recent statistics on the courts, police, and corrections, it is thought provoking and the current examples used also spur critical thinking on the justice in the United States. The authors give an alternative interpretation of the criminal justice that is rarely presented in the traditional textbooks or elsewhere. Discussions in the books about how the criminal justice system was perceived by the Hispanics, whites, women, African Americans, juveniles and everyone else contribute the context for understanding the different viewpoints.

In writing the final project, it is very important ot understand the criminal justice system first form a general viewpoint. This will help know where we are coming from as a country, and where we are. Understand ing the criminal justice will help give a better insight of what is required to work as a professional in the criminal justice system.

References

Cole, G., Smith, C., & DeJong, C. (2015). Criminal justice in America. Boston: Cengage

Learning.

Gaines, L., & Miller, R. (2015). Criminal justice in action: The core (Eighth ed.). Boston:

Cengage Learning.

Law, J. (2015). A dictionary of law (Eighth ed.). Oxford: Oxford University press.

McDermott, S. (2012). The jury in Lincoln’s America. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press.

Rubenser, L., & Priddy, G. (2011). Constables, marshals, and more forgotten offices in Texas

law enforcement. Denton: University of North Texas Press.

Shelden, R., Brown, W., Miller, K., & Fritzler, R. (2015). Crime and Criminal Justice in

American Society (Second ed.). Illinois: Waveland press.




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