Genetic disorders of muscle tissues

Genetic disorders of muscle tissues

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The body of a human and the living organism have two unique muscular system namely axial and appendicular muscle systems. We find axial muscles in the trunk and head. Appendicular muscles are muscles of the arms and legs. Both muscular systems help one in performing different tasks. Tissues get infected by different disorders which narrow down their operation (Emery, 2002). The causes range from natural, physical to genetic diseases which are our primary concern in this abstract. Muscular dystrophy is a disease caused by a mutation in dystrophin gene of chromosome X and commonly found in men. Dystrophy disorders have the following characteristics. Pain and stiffness of muscles, difficulty when running or jumping, walking on toes.

Dystrophy is a hereditary disorder with no cure as per now. The diseases interfere with the production of muscle protein which leads to weakening of the muscle. If not checked earlier, the patient may not be able to walk, may experience muscle and tendon shortening, have problems in breathing, swallowing and may experience weakening of cardiac tissues. Reduction of the impacts of dystrophy in patients can be through exercise, having breathing aid, physical and chemical therapy and administration of medicine. If the effects are far in the appendicular muscles getting a wheelchair for the patent can be helpful.

Muscular dystrophy disorders are of different types which include Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Becker Muscular Dystrophy, Myotone, Congenital among other complications. All these disorders are genetically based. The most common is the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. DMD is typical in young boys within the age of twenty’s or later, but it is rare among old people. DMD causes a deficiency of dystrophin protein in the muscles making muscular cells to become weak and easily fragile. The weakening leads to cell damage.

References

Emery, A. E. (2002). The muscular dystrophies. The Lancet359(9307), 687-695.

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