Final Paper Proposal

Final Paper Proposal

HIS379: The Atlantic World

Final Paper Proposal

Resources

Fields, B. (n.d.). Slavery, Race and Ideology in the United States of America. Retrieved from http://mobile.www.studythepast.com/4333_spring12/materials/fields%20slavery%20race%20and%20ideology.pdf.

This article discusses the establishment of the first plantations in America. In the beginning, plantation owners relied on indentured servants for labor, however, between costs and the start of the tobacco boom, colonists needed to find a cheaper more committed labor force. Although the English settlers weren’t accustomed to slavery in the Old World, it became a necessity that ultimately became a dependence. This article provides an insight into the life and introduction of Africans arriving to America.

Jordan, W. D., & Omohundro Institute of Early American History &, C. (2012). White Over Black: American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press.

This book helps provide an insight into what the white Europeans thought of the African’s upon first exploring Africa. By exploring the mindset of white Europeans, we can establish a reason for their decision to transition to a society with slaves. Understanding the way European settlers viewed and treated Africans helps provide an insight to the hardships they faced.

Obikili, N. (2016). The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and Local Political Fragmentation in Africa. Economic History Review, 69(4), 1157–1177. https://doi-org.proxy-library.ashford.edu/http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291468-0289/is sues

This article analyzes anthropological data to explore the political and economic impact the trans-Atlantic slave trade had on African towns and villages. The article shows the precolonial towns and villages that were involved with slave exports were more politically fragmented. This fragmentation impacted the economic development and it continues to influence African political institutions to this day.

Primary Sources from the Transatlantic Slave Trade (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.lew-port.com/cms/lib/NY19000328/Centricity/Domain/135/Primary%20Sources%20Slave%20Trade.pdf

This primary source is derived from the writings of Ottobah Cugoano, Olaudah Equiano, and Mary Prince, all Africans kidnapped from their homeland in Africa and brought to America during the Transatlantic Slave Trade. This source provides first-hand experiences of a slaves and the experiences and sufferings they endured. The article further explains the impact the slave trade had on the colonists and the country.

Inikori, J. & Engerman, L. (1992). The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on Economies, Societies and Peoples in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. Durham, NC: Duke University Press

This book provides a combination of essays on the impact the transatlantic slave trade had on the economic development of Europe and the United States, the social cost on Africa from forced migration, and the effects slavery had on the black mortality, health, and life in the New World.

Outline

1. Introduction

“The crucial differences which distinguish human societies and human beings are not biological. They are cultural” (Ruth Benedict). When Europeans first sought new lands to expand their trade and gain wealth and prosperity, they found societies full of complex and diverse cultures. Upon discovering Africa, Europeans had to learn to adapt and accept enormous cultural differences and make decisions that put survival and religious views over humanity. While slavery was a normal part of African culture, the Europeans exploited it to meet the labor demands of new colonial plantations, all of which had enormous effects on both societies and cultures.

2. Initial Contact: Europeans and Africans

3. Transatlantic Slave Trade

  • This part will provide an overview of the first European contact with Africa and the initial impressions the European had about the African people.

4. Establishing a New Culture

  • This part explains the transatlantic slave trade and the impact it had on both the Africa and Europe.

5. Conclusion

  • This part explains the new culture of American society for both the Africans and the Europeans.

References

Fields, B. (n.d.). Slavery, Race and Ideology in the United States of America. Retrieved from http://mobile.www.studythepast.com/4333_spring12/materials/fields%20slavery%20race%20and%20ideology.pdf.

Jordan, W. D., & Omohundro Institute of Early American History &, C. (2012). White Over Black: American Attitudes Toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press.

Obikili, N. (2016). The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and Local Political Fragmentation in Africa. Economic History Review, 69(4), 1157–1177. https://doi-org.proxy-library.ashford.edu/http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291468-0289/is sues

Primary Sources from the Transatlantic Slave Trade (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.lew-port.com/cms/lib/NY19000328/Centricity/Domain/135/Primary%20Sources%20Slave%20Trade.pdf

Inikori, J. & Engerman, L. (1992). The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on Economies, Societies and Peoples in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. Durham, NC: Duke University Press