Heather Hart’s Northern Oracle

Heather Hart’s Northern Oracle

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The Northern Oracle is an artwork of rooftop installation coming to the floor of a gallery, a series of drawing obtained from the media characterize the rooftop installation to make the building look marvelous. The theme conveyed by the media drawing at the Heather Hart is the black histories of art and drawings, accessibility to ownerships, imagination and creating a physical space within a building, and the importance of having a residential place to call home.

The floor level lattice and the rooftop are all accessible to the visitors who contemplate and imagine of the coronary that defines the vantage points. Out of all the magnificent drawing in this place, the Oracle which is located along the attic happens to be the site specific shrine that portrays the heart of all the artworks and drainage in the rooftop. It is regarded as the place where visitors seek solace to and give offerings to the Heather Hart.

The Norther n Oracle is the sign of social value and provides an area where perforate takes place. At this point, the influence of the Heather Hart, the power it possess and the directions where the idiom also is known as “shout it from the rooftop” is located. It also identifies the locations of the performance, the place of conducting workshops and the lecture venues where the visitors will be told more about the Heather Hart.

The Northern Oracle also gives visitors an opportunity to interact with every aspect of the arts and drawings on the floor and the rooftop of the building to familiarize with the art and design. However, the Northern Oracle, however, restricts the visitors to certain principles and conditions that must be met before engaging in a physical interaction with the performative area. The shoes must be flat, and of the rubber sole, the visitors must be over ten years and any person below 18 years old must access the Northern Oracle in the company of a guardian. It is also illegal for any visitor coming to the Northern Oracle to carry items such as a cell phone, camera, and a purse.

The art paintings and drawings by Heather Hart are of a wide variety, but a majority of those found on the floor and the rooftop are participatory and interactive installations. Also, several drawings, paintings, and collage are present in the Northern Oracle. These paintings and drawing have been exhibited in various international forums such as the Institute of Contemporary Art that took place in Philadelphia, the Gantt Center in Charlotte the Seattle Art Museum located in the Olympic sculpture park (University of Toronto Scarborough, 2017).

As viewers interact with the drawing and design that characterize the Northern Oracle, they get to understands the facts behind the impressive art. The astonishing paintings and drawings are derived from metals, wood, shingle, cardboards, and gold leaf. It is the first parts of the Heather Hart series of art. A significant role played by the Northern Oracle art is that it outlines meditation, the contemplation, the discord, self-empowerment and security issues surrounding the drawings and paintings (University of Toronto Scarborough, 2017).

An accurate view of the paintings and drawing at the Northern Oracle reveals that Heather Hart intended to illustrate the end ties of the world that was characterized by the abolition of traditional beliefs and practices. Successive teaching and experience are also depicted in the painting to justify their significance in contemporary art. The arts explicitly indicate a reflection of space that is safe for a living on top of houses. It also served as a self-healing and meditation art where people would make wishes. Today, the Northern Oracle stand out as one of the main paintings and drawings that influence the art in the society (University of Toronto Scarborough, 2017).

Reference

University of Toronto Scarborough (2017). Heather Hart Northern Oracle. Available at

https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~dmg/html/exhibitions/hart.html. Accessed on 07/03/2017