BIO 204 Week 1 Mitosis Cell Phases

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Mitosis: Cell Phases

The phases of mitosis can be observed by staining cells of rapidly growing tissue so the chromosomes can be seen. You have read about each phase separately, but remember that mitosis is a continuous process and that the phases (designated by human observers for your convenience) really merge from one to the next.

Review the phases of mitosis in your text. Pay particular attention to the photographs of real cells undergoing mitosis.

Complete the table with the following:

For each phase, in 40–60 words, describe in your own words (paraphrase) the major events that occur in the cell. What would you expect the cell or nucleus to look like in each phase? Could you see the chromosomes and the nuclear membrane? If you could see the chromosomes, how would you expect them to be arranged?

Provide a drawing that you create of what the cell would look like in each phase (Suggestion – take pictures and upload the pictures and imbed them here).

Include your references and in-text citations. APA formatted references should go at the end of this document and each response should have an in-text citation.

Phase Description Drawing
Interphase The stage in the development of a cell following mitosis or meiosis, during which the nucleus is not dividing. In cells that will undergo further division, the DNA in the nucleus is duplicated in preparation for the next division.(The American Heritage Science Dictionary)  
Prophase The stage in the development of a cell following mitosis or meiosis, during which the nucleus is not dividing. In cells that will undergo further division, the DNA in the nucleus is duplicated in preparation for the next division. (The American Heritage Science Dictionary)  
Metaphase The stage of cell division in which the duplicated chromosomes become aligned along the center of the cell, called the equatorial plate or metaphase plate. Metaphase lasts up to an hour, and ends in mitosis and the second division of meiosis when separation of the paired chromosomal strands (called chromatids) begins. (The American Heritage Science Dictionary)  
Anaphase The stage of cell division in mitosis or meiosis in which the doubled set of chromosomes separates into two identical groups that move to opposite ends of the cell. Anaphase is preceded by metaphase and followed by telophase.  
Telophase The final phase of cell division, in which membranes form around the two groups of chromosomes, each at opposite ends of the cell, to produce the two nuclei of the daughter cells. The spindle disappears, and the cytoplasm usually divides (in the process called cytokinesis). In mitosis, telophase is preceded by anaphase. In meiosis, telophase occurs twice, once as part of the first meiotic division (when it is usually called telophase I) and once during the second meiotic division (when it is usually called telophase II).  
Cytokinesis The division of the cytoplasm of a cell following the division of the nucleus during cell division  

References

“Botany: An Introduction of Life”




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