Heat Transfer

Heat Transfer

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Question one

The water, Water has more thermal energy than hot air. Thermal energy is energy from the motion of particles. When heat is applied to matter, the particles begin to move and vibrate. This movement causes movement from one molecule to another. Water has more thermal energy because it has more particles which are moving and thus more energy is stored (Bejan, 2013). However, air has more kinetic energy than water, kinetic energy is gained by the motion of the particles. The air in the microwave have more energy because when heated, they move faster thus they generate more kinetic energy (Bejan, 2013).

Question 2

As the soup got hotter the heat particles were conducted to the spoon, the metal particles got heated through conduction of heat through its particles, the spoon got hotter the longer it stayed in the soup because heat particles got heated much longer thus they contained more thermal energy (Bejan, 2013). To prevent burning when touching the spoon, I could introduce an insulating material. Insulating materials are materials whose particles are poor conductors of heat. Crafting a wooden handle for the spoon can prevent the heating. Therefore, I can stir my soup without burning.

As the soup got hotter the heat particles were conducted to the spoon, the metal particles got heated through conduction of heat through its particles, the spoon got hotter the longer it stayed in the soup because heat particles got heated much longer thus they contained more thermal energy. To prevent burning when touching the spoon, I could introduce an insulating material. Insulating materials are materials whose particles are poor conductors of heat (Bejan, 2013). Crafting a wooden handle for the spoon can prevent the heating. Therefore, I can stir my soup without burning.

You place a When you swab rubbing alcohol on your skin it feels cold for a few minutes- even though the alcohol has been sitting at room temperature. Explain the process that cools your skin in this case (Churaev, 2018). The alcohol particles absorb energy from your skin in terms of heat, the heat is turned into thermal energy, as the particles heat up they begin to evaporate, when evaporating the alcohol particles are changed into gas, while the particles are evaporating they take away heat from the skin thus providing the cooling effect.

When the fire on the burner is heated, it heats up the surrounding air particles, the particles at the bottom are heated and therefore they become lighter, the heavier particles of air move down to occupy as the lighter particles move upwards, the heavier get heated and move up, this motion of air creates conventional energy (Baxter et al., 2018). When the hot air particles hit the surface of the pot they apply the heat and the molecules of air in the pot material begin to heat up, the more the heat is applied the more they move, the movement of heat through solids is called conduction, it happens when heated molecules begin to vibrate and move, this vibration causes collision with other particles and thus the energy is transferred (Baxter et al., 2018).

The water particles at the bottom of the pot being in contact with hot pot they begin to conduct heat. The heat particles causes the water molecules to move. The water molecules at the bottom become lighter and they get displaced by heavier molecules at the top.as more energy is applied more movement is generated (Churaev, 2018). The heat transfer that occurs in the water particles is also convection.

Conclusion

There are basically three methods of heat transfer, metals transfer heat by conduction, heat energy is transferred from particle to particle through the vibration and thus the energy is conducted. Convention is the methods where the heat molecules are heat and displaced as the lighter one seek to rise. Like in the case of fluids and gases (Baxter et al., 2018).

References

Baxter, L., Hoeger, C., Burt, S., Mansfield, E., Stitt, K., & Davis, N. (2018). U.S. Patent Application No. 15/472,516.

Bejan, A. (2013). Convection heat transfer. John wiley & sons.

Churaev, N. V. (2018). Liquid and vapour flows in porous bodies: surface phenomena. Routledge.